Crossword 026: Rejection

 
 William Powell Frith, The Rejected Poet

William Powell Frith, The Rejected Poet

 

Today's puzzle is a prequel to the one published yesterday in the Los Angeles Times—that is, the theme of this puzzle is related to that of the other as cause to effect.  I built the puzzle around 29 Across, the basis for which I have since learned is not so common a phrase as I had supposed.  Google's ngram viewer shows that the phrase reached a peak around 1820, held steady through 1910, and then began a precipitous decline.  This is a pity, for the unhappy state of mind it tersely describes is a defining feature of human experience, one given frequent attention in Victorian novels, and one I'm delighted to reconceive, through the miracle of cruciverbalism, as a comically self-conceited anthropomorphic bird.


Download this week's crossword:

026-Rejection.puz

026-Rejection.pdf

Crossword 020: Superheroes

 
Lord Frederic Leighton - The Last Watch of Hero.jpg
 

Lord Frederic Leighton, The Last Watch of Hero


There are few areas of popular culture I know less about than superhero comic strips and the movies based on them.  In this I must be unusual, for they seem to come up frequently in crosswords, especially those in the New York Times.  "Thor" is not just a Norse god but, apparently, a superhero.  "Atom" is a diminutive superhero, "green" is superhero " ___ Lantern"; "iron" is superhero "___ man."   Anyway, this puzzle is my little act of protest.  It's filled with superheroes of my own making, the sort of superheroes I'd like to read about.  22 Across, in particular, is the sort of superhero we need right now.


Download this week's crossword:

020-Superheroes.puz

020-Superheroes.pdf

Crossword 018: Spatial Relations

 
 Sir Laurence Alma-Tadema, A Favourite Custom

Sir Laurence Alma-Tadema, A Favourite Custom

 

As every child knows, there were nine Muses:  Calliope, Clio, Euterpe, Erato, Melpomene, Polyhymnia, Terpsichore, Thalia, and Urania.  Erato is a crossword favorite, on account of her attractive vowels.  However, Wikipedia informs us that there were originally only three Muses, representing Practice, Memory,  and Song—and I have constructed this crossword with the purpose of giving some long-overdue attention to this neglected trio, especially its second member, featured in 54 Down, which is where I began work.  I really wanted to fit in the other two—Melete and Aoide—but my theme got in the way.